Books – Management Culture and Psychology

Goal (Eliyahu Goldratt & Jeff Cox)

Bit unusual for this list, but included as it is written as a story about how to identify and schedule bottlenecks. For the operations managers amongst us.

Rating: Worthwhile

Transparency (Bennis/Goleman/O’Toole)

Three of the GOds of management on the issues of transparency and candour. Seems obvious but organisations rarely do it.  A wake up call.

Rating: Must Read

Riding the Waves of Culture (Fons Trompenaars & Charles Hampden-Turner)

This is an excellent introduction to the complex topic of managing and understanding across cultures. It is written with wit and humour and covers a range of topics from the expected subject of relationships to increasingly vital issues such as attitudes to time and nature.

Rating: Excellent

Riding the Whirlwind (Fons Trompenaars & Charles Hampden-Turner)

A further look at how different cultures interact with globalisation and how creativity and innovation can best be accessed in this complex environment.

Rating: Worthwhile

Changing Minds (Howard Gardner)

A valuable look at how we view things and the reasoning and psychology behind it. Gardner identifies a range of triggers and hurdles that have to be recognised when seeking to bring about changes in peoples views.

Rating: Excellent

Five Minds for the Future (Howard Gardner)

A further development of the work done in “Changing Minds” but this time extending it to consider the capabilities that are needed in an ever accelerating rate of change.

Rating: Excellent

Principle Centred Leadership (Stephen R. Covey)

The application of seven habits to leadership. It has the same strengths and weaknesses.

Rating: Worthwhile

Nudge (Richard H. Thaler & Cass R. Sunstein)

A look at “Choice Architectures” and how effective framing can increase the chances of getting people to make positive decisions regarding everything from health to finance. They acknowledge the point that the techniques can be seen as manipulative but argue that their intentions are benign.  Those who read Gardner’s book on risk may argue otherwise.

Rating: Worthwhile

The Fifth Discipline (Peter Senge)

The seminal work on the learning organisation.

Rating: Must Read

Good to Great (Jim Collins)

Another seminal work but in reality a sort of “best of” of many of the other books listed here. For my money, the single biggest issue is getting the right people into the business before you decide the strategy.

Rating: Must Read

Communication Power (Manuel Castells)

An interesting intersection of Neuroscience and News – how news is spun in the digital age to tap into the way we think.

Rating: Excellent

Drive (Dan Pink)

Pink on what motivates us in the second decade of the 21st Century. Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose.

Rating: Excellent

Iconoclast  (Dr Gregory Burns)

A simply stunning book for anybody interested in not following the herd. A neuroscience based insight into those who think differently.

Rating: Must Read

Your Brain at Work (David Rock)

A very readable book, looking at coaching from a neuroscience perspective.

Rating: Excellent

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